Wii game Disney Princess: Enchanted Journey and its impact on my life

by | Mar 18, 2024 | Creative, Culture, Opinions | 0 comments

Disney Princess: Enchanted Journey for the Wii was more than just a game for my sister and me during our early elementary years. It was a much needed escape from the harsh realities my family faced at the time. Back then, life was pretty tough, and finding moments of happiness were fleeting. But, everything changed when my dad got us a Nintendo Wii for Christmas, complete with that magical game that became our refuge. Sure, the graphics were nothing fancy by today’s standards or comparable to games released in the same year (2007), but that didn’t matter. The game’s premise was simple: an abandoned castle, evil little fellas called bogs ruining Disney princess worlds, and a little girl armed with magic to fix it all thanks to her fairy friend. It was our ticket to a world where reality took a backseat and we could be the good in an alternate evil world.

The game had four unique worlds with different princesses — Ariel, Jasmine, Snow White, and Cinderella — plus an unlockable one with Belle once the previous four worlds were clean of bogs. We’d lose ourselves in these enchanted lands, help out the princesses, and fight off evil together. It wasn’t just a game to me; it was a journey, as the name implies. We’d spend ages dressing up our characters before we even stepped foot through one of the mirror portals, embarking on our adventures as sisters. She was the main player, and I was her trusty sidekick, or better known as a live viewer, just as a younger sibling is required to be. Each princess became a friend we were determined to help and get to know along the way. Snow White was my personal favourite. Singing with the seven dwarfs while mining gems was a highlight that made the game feel like they were talking to me, even though it was a silly script. Again, I played this from ages five to eight so that disconnect wasn’t fully built.

Looking back, Disney Princess: Enchanted Journey wasn’t just a game; it was a guidebook on kindness and teamwork. Growing up in a less-than-perfect situation, it taught us that even in tough times, there’s always a chance to make things a bit brighter. The lessons from those magical lands stuck with me and added “non” to “fiction”. While I might not face evil bogs in my daily life, there are plenty of metaphorical ones that are just as annoying. The game’s impact went beyond childhood — it shaped my personality and how I approach life. It taught me the importance of kindness and helping others, even in the face of challenging times.

Now, as an adult, the game is a cherished memory, and a reminder of the power of imagination and the enduring impact of childhood experiences. No matter how old I get, the enchanting journey of those Disney princess worlds will always hold a special place in my heart and act as a reminder that sometimes, a little escapism can go a long way.


Cover image by Avery Chilton.

Avery Chilton

The Griff

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related articles

Passing the torch

Passing the torch

A raw conversation shared between two culture editors, one from the past and one from the present. Before the Griff, Intercamp ran the news around...